Tag Archives: QA

Ken Levine guest of BAFTA for Bioshock Infinite Q&A

12 Mar

ken levine bafta

Last night BAFTA Games were joined by Ken Levine, creative director and co-founder of Irrational Games, at The Princess Anne Theatre in Piccadilly for a very interesting Bioshock Q&A session.

Levine talked about storytelling, character development, taking risks in games and many other game-related (and Bioshock-related) stuff.

In the first half of the evening, Levine gave a presentation outlining his  main aims for BioShock Infinite. He talked about the importance of “emotionally connecting gamers with the characters”, something he sees as a hallmark of the BioShock series. Levine then showed the complex process of creating the range of emotions for the AI of Elizabeth; from the voiceover to the motion-captures.

In the second part, Simon Parkin (from The Guardian) interviewed Levine on how his career developed, and what advice he could offer to those trying to break into the game industry. Levine was keen to emphasise the great luck he has had in his career. First, his discovery that he had a gift for writing and secondly, the opportunity he got to work on Thief: The Dark Project having never written for games before.

However, he also underlined that new developers must be willing to work incredibly hard: “It took us four months of talking before I wrote BioShock Infinite over two drafts”.

It is clear that Bioshock Infinite will be taking his company’s mission to its most ambition point to date.

You can read more about this Q&A event on BAFTA’s official report and/or reading the Twitter reel from BAFTA Games.

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Game Developer Salary Survey 2013

4 Feb

The Game Developer Magazine and Gamasutra are inviting readers to participate in their annual Game Developer Salary Survey, a worldwide, publicly-released statistical study of game industry salaries and benefits.

The survey takes approximately 6-7 minutes to complete, and will run until Friday, February 22nd. The results will be published on April 2013.

So if you are a programmer, a game designer, a tester, an animator (or you just clean the toilets at Ubisoft) you can fill out the survey here. Obviously it is anonymous, and none of the information presented will be associated with any individually identifiable information.

But what are the results from the last year? Here we go! (bad news for you testers)

Programming: Already some of the highest paid talent in the game industry, programmers made even more in 2011 as their average salary jumped up to nearly $92,962 from $85,733. Salaries increased across the experience spectrum, with newer workers (under three years of experience) reporting a whopping $10,700 average increase over last year.

Art and Animation: Artists and animators’ average salaries increased to $75,780 over the previous year’s average of $71,354. The largest gains went to art directors and lead/technical artists, which bodes well for the industry veterans and less so for the younger artists and animators.

Game Design: Game designers, writers, and creative directors were paid $73,386 on average in 2011, up from $70,223. Game designers with less than three years of experience received the biggest boost over last year ($3,500).

Production: Though producers saw a huge increase in 2010 for their average salaries to $88,544, that dropped last year to $85,687. Most of these cuts were felt by producers with 3-6 years of experience, whose average salaries fell about $4,900 from 2010, and by producers with over six years of experience, whose salaries were cut by $3,300. Women continue to be comparatively well-represented in the production department (16 percent) — men absorbed most of the salary drop, while female producers’ salaries actually rose.

Audio: The average audio professional’s reported salary in 2011 was significantly higher, $83,182 compared to 2010’s $68,088. While it is difficult to draw meaningful conclusions from the data due to there being fewer respondents for this category compared to other disciplines, we received 30 percent more responses from audio professionals than we did in 2010, so the job market might just be on the uptick.

Quality Assurance: Quality assurance professionals (testers and QA leads) are the lowest-paid workers in the games industry for yet another year — and in 2011, their average salary decreased to $47,910 from $49,009 in 2010. The salary hit was mostly felt by QA leads with over six years of experience, while those with less experience in the field actually earned more.

Business: Business and legal employees are still the highest paid in the industry, but their salaries dropped from $106,452 in 2010 to $102,160 last year. Those with more than six years of experience were negatively impacted the most, making nearly $8,000 less. Newcomers, however, saw their average salaries increase by $14,000.