Tag Archives: industry

Lollipop Chainsaw MUST have been made

8 Feb

warren spector lollipop chainsaw

We’re sure by now everyone following videogame’s news already know the in-famous speech made by Warren Spector at D.I.C.E., as we’re sure most of you, reading this blog, is frustrated about what the well respected game designer said.

Well, we are frustrated too and we can’t just shut up and let it go!

Before to start complaining, a short reminder on what happened for the those living in an another world.

During the D.I.C.E. (Design, Innovate, Communicate, Entertain) summit in Las Vegas, famous game designer Warren Spector talked how, now that he’s 50 years old, he changed his mind about what he likes and what he would like to see in video games. 
Nothing bad until…

“My interests in content have changed dramatically and I suspect this is true for many of you. There are some games the should just not be made.”, 

talking about Suda51 and Grasshopper’s LOLLIPOP CHAINSAW, going on with “I want content that is relevant to my life, that is relevant to me, that is set in the real world…”

If you want to read more take a look to Kotaku‘s article here, but that’s enough to make you understand why we are so upset and disappointed that someone into the game industry, specifically a game designer, could think we need more “reality” in video games. 
No Mr. Spector, we DON’T need it. We don’t need the real world in our games.
 If we wanted something like that we just have turned on the TV and and watched the news, peraphs opened the door and took a walk.

Video games are a form of entertainment and ART that make all us DREAM. Why are you still here playing games at your age? Why, Mr. Spector, did you start work in the industry? Because we’re sure even you, as everyone, remember how cool it was to be someone else for few hours when you were a kid: an Italian plumber with mustache who wanted to save his princess, a blue hedgehog who could run at the speed of light, a boy dressed in green with an annoying fairy as companion.

We want to see the world burn, we want to see zombie apocalypses, aliens invasions and damn, YES, we want to fight them not with boring grey normal weapons but with a heart shaped chainsaws, rainbows and dancing cheerleaders!


The lack of ideas and fantasy is killing video games, we had enough Call of Duty look alike stuff in this new generation.
 If this is not relevant to your life, Mr. Spector, than maybe is time to ask yourself what your job is about. 

Keep in mind this is just our opinion, maybe a nostalgic vision of an industry that is radically changed during the years to adapt at the majority of people (see: casual gamers), but such a speech coming from someone inside the industry is quite sad and disappointing.

Let’s hope is just a 50 years old man having a break down. And let us know what you think!

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Game Developer Salary Survey 2013

4 Feb

The Game Developer Magazine and Gamasutra are inviting readers to participate in their annual Game Developer Salary Survey, a worldwide, publicly-released statistical study of game industry salaries and benefits.

The survey takes approximately 6-7 minutes to complete, and will run until Friday, February 22nd. The results will be published on April 2013.

So if you are a programmer, a game designer, a tester, an animator (or you just clean the toilets at Ubisoft) you can fill out the survey here. Obviously it is anonymous, and none of the information presented will be associated with any individually identifiable information.

But what are the results from the last year? Here we go! (bad news for you testers)

Programming: Already some of the highest paid talent in the game industry, programmers made even more in 2011 as their average salary jumped up to nearly $92,962 from $85,733. Salaries increased across the experience spectrum, with newer workers (under three years of experience) reporting a whopping $10,700 average increase over last year.

Art and Animation: Artists and animators’ average salaries increased to $75,780 over the previous year’s average of $71,354. The largest gains went to art directors and lead/technical artists, which bodes well for the industry veterans and less so for the younger artists and animators.

Game Design: Game designers, writers, and creative directors were paid $73,386 on average in 2011, up from $70,223. Game designers with less than three years of experience received the biggest boost over last year ($3,500).

Production: Though producers saw a huge increase in 2010 for their average salaries to $88,544, that dropped last year to $85,687. Most of these cuts were felt by producers with 3-6 years of experience, whose average salaries fell about $4,900 from 2010, and by producers with over six years of experience, whose salaries were cut by $3,300. Women continue to be comparatively well-represented in the production department (16 percent) — men absorbed most of the salary drop, while female producers’ salaries actually rose.

Audio: The average audio professional’s reported salary in 2011 was significantly higher, $83,182 compared to 2010’s $68,088. While it is difficult to draw meaningful conclusions from the data due to there being fewer respondents for this category compared to other disciplines, we received 30 percent more responses from audio professionals than we did in 2010, so the job market might just be on the uptick.

Quality Assurance: Quality assurance professionals (testers and QA leads) are the lowest-paid workers in the games industry for yet another year — and in 2011, their average salary decreased to $47,910 from $49,009 in 2010. The salary hit was mostly felt by QA leads with over six years of experience, while those with less experience in the field actually earned more.

Business: Business and legal employees are still the highest paid in the industry, but their salaries dropped from $106,452 in 2010 to $102,160 last year. Those with more than six years of experience were negatively impacted the most, making nearly $8,000 less. Newcomers, however, saw their average salaries increase by $14,000.

Xseed Games is bringing five new Japanese titles outside Japan in 2013

31 Jan

Who are these guys and why we should thank them?

Well, Xseed Games is a small (and when I say small, I mean really small, like 9 people) video games publisher and distributor based in Torrance, California; and we should thank them because their only purpose is to bring weird, strange and beautiful Japanese games to the North American market (and eventually let them know to European publishers).

Xseed Games HQ. You just met half of the employees.

Xseed Games HQ. You just met half of the employees.

We really appreciate them (and everybody should do), because unlike the bigger guys (someone said Activision, Electronic Arts and Ubisoft?) they don’t really care about money. They’re happy to just focus on eccentric (and mostly weird, but always amazing) Japanese games, from dating simulations to j-RPGs.

You should thank them for being able to play titles such as KORG DS-10 (NDS, 2008), Ys Seven (PSP, 2010) or The Last Story (2012, Wii) localized in your language. But this is not all. In a press release this morning, Xseed Games announced that it’s bringing five new games outside Japan: Killer Is Dead (yep, new game from Suda51)(X360 / PS3, Summer 2013), Rune Factory 4 (3SD, Summer 2013), Valhalla Knights 3 (PSVita, Fall 2013), Ys Celceta (PSVita, Fall 2013), and Ys I & II Chronicles (Steam, February 2013).

We leave you with trailers about those new upcoming games. Enjoy, and be respectful to Xseed.

This last one about Ys I & II is from the PSP version, because there’s not Steam version trailer out there.