Tag Archives: indie game

Slave Of God | Gameplay

8 Mar

slave of god increpare

Few weeks ago we told you about a new upcoming game from Stephen Lavelle, founder of indie developer Increpare Games, but today we want to show you one of his masterpiece. It’s called Slave Of God and probably it is the most disturbing, weird and seizure-giving game we’ve aver played.

As far as we know the game is set in a nightclub, with loud music, booze, strobo lights and everything, but there isn’t a proper plot…nor a proper objective. It just happen to be there. Obviously (and luckily) the game HAS an end, that could be interpreted in different ways…

During the gameplay you can interact with other NPC, drinking together, dancing….pissing…falling in love.

But you can’t understand the real essence of the game until you play it, or at least watch a gameplay video (flashing light/seizure warning).

You can download the game for free (for both Windows and Mac) from here and/or check other weird games from Increpare here.

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Edmund McMillen from Team Meat talks about Mew-Genics

25 Feb

mew-genics

Seems like we are literally surrounded by cats-related games! After our last week’s little post about Jones On Fire (expect a sort-of-review when the game will be out next week) we are here again talking about kitties! This time with Edmund McMillen from Team Meat, one of the two guys behind Super Meat Boy, and a new project for PC, iOS and Android: Mew-Genics!

mew-genics

 

What’s this game about? Hard to say (kitties?), but McMillen tried to explain it a bit on his blog:

“For the past 17 weeks we have teased many aspects of Mew-Genics, but none were totally clear on what the game actually was and how it played. Part of this was due to the fact that we have basically been working on the game as long as we had been teasing it, so we ourselves were a bit in the dark on the details, but the main reason was because Mew-Genics is a hard game to explain.

I think most would describe Mew-Genics as a cross between The Sims and Pokemon with a sprinkling of Animal Crossing and a dash of Tamagotchi , but at its core the game really isn’t like anything we’ve seen before.

Mew-Genics revolves around Cats, obviously. We knew tending to these cats in a simulated “cat lady” environment would be the foundation of our design, but the core of what we are trying to do is make a game that feels alive, a game that creates stories as you play where consequences actually mean something…

I could write a book on the design of mew-genics, it’s by far the most complex game I’ve ever worked on and it’s definitely pushing us both on many levels.”

mew-genics

Still don’t get it right? Ok, let’s try with McMillen talking about one of his playing experiences with Mew-Genics:

“Last week I was playing a game with Puddle, a fat female cat I had been working on earlier that day, I thawed her out of her Cryo-cube and placed her in my current single story house along with her newly generated companion Champ. I had been focusing my time on Puddle due to the fact that she seemed to have a very unique tail that I believe had helped her place 2nd in a cat pageant in a previous and I needed to breed her so I could continue her bloodline before she got too old. Sadly Champ wasn’t up to snuff and Puddle made this obvious by repeatedly kicking him in the face, I separated them quickly by putting champ in the attic but when I tried to feed him.. something odd happened. See, Champ was a dullard and when Puddle kicked him he just happened to also be eating and now associated the trauma with food instead of Puddle herself, he was scared of all food.. and sadly died in the attic shortly after. 

It wasn’t long after though that I caught sight of a solid black stray cat named Goon, before he had a chance to run I grabbed him and pulled him inside. Goon was a much better fit for Puddle and before I knew it the humping started and puddle was pregnant! I put her in the attic with plenty of food and a bed, but quickly noticed that something was up with Goon, he seemed to be constantly falling asleep. As it turned out Goon was a narcoleptic and as you might have guessed Puddle gave birth to 2 sleeping kittens, one of them fat like his mother and black like his dad and the other small but with his mom’s markings and that amazing forked tail that helped in the last pageant, but sadly both kittens were narcoleptic like their father… 

Goon acted aggressively towards the kittens so I let him back out into the yard and he eventually ran away. As the kittens grew up I did enter the small one (his name was Dot) into a pageant but sadly he just fell asleep on the stage and didn’t win anything. To add insult to injury Puddle also acquired feline aids from Goon and I couldn’t afford any of the expensive treatments Dr. Beanies was offering so I put her back in the Cryo-cube in hopes that in the future I might have a cure for her disease once I finish a few more of the Doctor’s missions. 

I wasn’t able to save Dot because I was arrested by the local animal control shortly after I put Puddle in the cube, probably because of letting Goon run away.. and the whole giving my other cat aids thing… or maybe it was the dead cat in the attic.”

That’s not a lot more clear, but for now it’s the only thing we got. We hope to share some news with you soon.

Interview: David Kanaga, sound designer of Proteus

5 Feb

We are really proud to share with you our little interview with David Kanaga, sound designer of Proteus.

If you don’t know what Proteus is, be ashamed. Proteus is a pure sensorial experience, both visual and audio; someone called it an anti-game, because its lack of plot or of a proper mission objective, but we don’t agree with them, because video games are a form of mixed arts, and this game is the proof. Proteus is pure art, game art.

It’s kind of weird trying to describe a game like this, you should really play it to understand what we mean. But for now take a look at the trailer.

 

Ok, now that you have a vague idea of what Proteus is, we can start our interview with David.

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• THAT DAMN PIXEL: You and Ed (Ed Key, the other guy behind the game) describe Proteus as a game of audio-visual exploration and discovery. How important is the audio component in this title? And why?

– DAVID KANAGA: It’s important to me. I don’t understand games very well if their mechanics are not hugged by music. Music moves constantly in ways that it’s difficult for visuals to do without seeming messy — messy is good (see this: Len Lye “Free Radicals”), but maybe we can approach these time-based languages with sound first.

THAT DAMN PIXEL: Did you write down the music after the graphical part was finished or the video/audio development went b2b?

– DAVID KANAGA: Sometimes after, sometimes b2b — there were no rules, though these are some loose guidelines that i sometimes follow as dogma: Soundtrack 2: Methods

• THAT DAMN PIXEL: How long did it take to create the music for a game like this one?

– DAVID KANAGA: sometimes it took exactly as long to make as it takes to listen to (~30 seconds) — much of the sound was improvised. designing the music as a space is more involved. the whole thing took almost 3 years.

• THAT DAMN PIXEL: How you met Ed, and how you two ended up making Proteus?

– DAVID KANAGA: I wanted to make music for a videogame, and I posted my music on TIGsource and only Ed liked it– he got in touch and we started working

THAT DAMN PIXEL: Are you proud of this particular work?

– DAVID KANAGA: Yes

THAT DAMN PIXEL: You won the INDIECADE 2011 for the Best Audio. Did you expect this prize?

– DAVID KANAGA: Wasn’t sure what to expect.

THAT DAMN PIXEL: Is Proteus your first game-project? Are you planning to continue on this field?

– DAVID KANAGA: No. The biggest other project I’ve done is music design for Dyad, released on PSN last July. I’ve done work on other games, too — Selected Works and Plays. I plan to continue.

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Well, this was amazing, and we feel very fortunate to met David. He is a very kind and willing person. We wish him (and also Ed) best of luck with Proteus and with his future projects.
Here’s some useful links! Follow David on Twitter, check out his site and BUY PROTEUS HERE!